Architecture & design Design

A seaside haven: The reimagining of a 70’s house into modern art

Inspired by the paintings of Japanese artist Hiroshi Sugimoto, architecture firm Estudio Primitivo Gonzalez transformed a tired apartment with peeling paint and outdated balusters into a modern escape fit for a true seaside escape.

The architecture firm reimagining this project designed this calm, relaxing seaside haven to be the frame of contemplation for the work of art viewed from it, in this case: the sea.

(c) Luis Díaz Díaz

Internal and external

Large windows look out across the sea, allowing a peaceful yet dynamic view from both the living space and the bedrooms. Even within the apartment itself, existing partitions were demolished and the relationship between the different spaces was reimagined by using a single curtain rail to create breaks within the space. This curtain rail snakes across the ceiling and allows the residents to create completely different areas within the apartment based on what they want and need at any given time. A large living room, an intimate bedroom, a dining area – whatever they want to create becomes possible even in the small 50 square metres of this seaside home.

(c) Luis Díaz Díaz

A space to relax

In using linoleum flooring, acoustic ceiling panels and high efficiency window frames, Estudio Primitivo Gonzalez created a space which would act like a private bubble, stopping noise coming in from outside or from other parts of the building. In using a soft, grey colour throughout the space, they additionally designed a toned-down, paired-back setting which creates contrast with the vibrant colours of the sunset, the seaside and the nearby residences, allowing the residents to retreat from the day-to-day and relax.

The use of fabric curtains rather than stark, solid walls allows for the ever-changing light outside to take hold inside the space and lend the colours of the sunrise, sunset and midday light to the spaces within the home, further cutting down boundaries between the inside and outside and allowing for residents to get lost in the view.

 

(c) Luis Díaz Díaz

Source: Archdaily.com

 

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